Les Super Shleu – Les Super Shleu, Universal Music Productions 1977

Les Super Shleu, front

It’s been 4 days since I found the time for some posts.
Been busy doing other things, but today we’re back with
something we didn’t see yet at the GG. Some time ago, one
of our loyal visitors, who lives in Paris asked me if I had
music from Haiti. At the time I was not familiar with it, so
I decided to dive into the matter. Compas is the name of this
style and it’s a happy sound. “The overall sound is sweet and
smooth and the melodies are carried on flowing guitar lines,
regulated by a characteristic rocking beat that pivots between
the hi-hat and a bass drum on the floor.”(Rough Guide)
I found this album on that fair last week. This weekend
I had to visit Paris for other matters and searched a little
for records too. I brought home some old LP’s by groups like
Shleu-Shleu and Coupé Cloué. You can expect some of those later.
For now, listen to this fine LP by Les Super Shleu.

tracks;

1 Marie-Annick
2 Carnaval marché presse
3 Vacances 77
4 Marie-Chantal
5 Pas feté cadence
6 Viré rond
7 Chouboulé
8 Ti mam’zelle
9 Nicole

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21 thoughts on “Les Super Shleu – Les Super Shleu, Universal Music Productions 1977

  1. Hey Moos, I was just thinking of asking you this week-end if you was ever coming to Paris and I learned that you was here !
    Next time tell me when you come…
    Anyway good news, seems like you found some good stuff, yum yum.
    What a beautiful cover, this album.
    Also big thanks, I discover through your blog, the listentoyourears blog, waaaa such a treasure and nice haitian albums too.

  2. Hey Moos, I was just thinking of asking you this week-end if you was ever coming to Paris and I learned that you was here !
    Next time tell me when you come…
    Anyway good news, seems like you found some good stuff, yum yum.
    What a beautiful cover, this album.
    Also big thanks, I discover through your blog, the listentoyourears blog, waaaa such a treasure and nice haitian albums too.

  3. It was a bit of a hurrie-trip but next time,.. glad I found the time to do one recordshop at least..
    and Arnaud, I have to thank you for introducing Compas to me.
    Cheers.

  4. It was a bit of a hurrie-trip but next time,.. glad I found the time to do one recordshop at least..
    and Arnaud, I have to thank you for introducing Compas to me.
    Cheers.

  5. Les Super Shleu was from Guadeloupe. Their music is called Cadence. Haitians call it also Compas because it came from compas in the 60s. In the mid 70s antillian Cadence had backwards big influences on Compas in Haiti…

    Les Shleu-Shleu were founded in 1965. Later there were also a separeted band in New York, and then in Haiti Original Shleu Shleu. – Some of them it are still recording CDs.

  6. Les Super Shleu was from Guadeloupe. Their music is called Cadence. Haitians call it also Compas because it came from compas in the 60s. In the mid 70s antillian Cadence had backwards big influences on Compas in Haiti…

    Les Shleu-Shleu were founded in 1965. Later there were also a separeted band in New York, and then in Haiti Original Shleu Shleu. – Some of them it are still recording CDs.

  7. While researching something else — “The Artist” by Johnny Pacheco, which sadly has never been properly remastered for digital distribution, and likely won’t be for a long time since Emusica went into receivership — I stumbled across your blog, Moos. Congratualations on your good work!

    Allow me to add a few notes on your francophone caribbean selections, a particular interest of mine.

    This particular disc represents an interesting transition period in Konpa (this is the currently correct spelling in Kreyol) from the “Mini-Jazz” to the “Full Band” eras. It should be noted that Konpa, like many other words describing music, can refer to a genre which identifies a particular audience or market (in this case, Haitian popular music), as well as a style with certain musical characteristics.

    To enumerate, the history of Konpa can be broadly marked by several periods: 1) «Compas Direct», as originated by Nemours Jean-Baptiste in 1955; 2) the Mini-Jazz period from the mid 1960s to 1970s; 3) the “Full Band” from the mid 1970s; 4) the “Nouvel Jenerasyon” from the late 1980s.

    The Mini-Jazz is so-called because it has about half the number of musicians — typically 6 to 9 — as the original ensembles which are usually around 18 to 21 in number. A distinguishing stylistic feature is the interplay between the guitar and the saxophone (usually alto). Another is the standardization of the drum kit rhythm which was pioneered by the drummer on this recording, Smith “Smitty” Jean-Baptiste. The pattern is very similar to the quintilla of the danzones from Oriente, Cuba. It is performed by using a crash type cymbal alternately choked and released by the left hand with a drum stick used to impart a “sizzle” effect, not by the hi-hat as asserted by some critics. Arguably the most influential ensemble from this period was Ibo Combo, with early Shleu-Shleu, Volo Volo, Groupe Latino, Scorpio and Les Loups Noires also highly regarded.

  8. While researching something else — “The Artist” by Johnny Pacheco, which sadly has never been properly remastered for digital distribution, and likely won’t be for a long time since Emusica went into receivership — I stumbled across your blog, Moos. Congratualations on your good work!

    Allow me to add a few notes on your francophone caribbean selections, a particular interest of mine.

    This particular disc represents an interesting transition period in Konpa (this is the currently correct spelling in Kreyol) from the “Mini-Jazz” to the “Full Band” eras. It should be noted that Konpa, like many other words describing music, can refer to a genre which identifies a particular audience or market (in this case, Haitian popular music), as well as a style with certain musical characteristics.

    To enumerate, the history of Konpa can be broadly marked by several periods: 1) «Compas Direct», as originated by Nemours Jean-Baptiste in 1955; 2) the Mini-Jazz period from the mid 1960s to 1970s; 3) the “Full Band” from the mid 1970s; 4) the “Nouvel Jenerasyon” from the late 1980s.

    The Mini-Jazz is so-called because it has about half the number of musicians — typically 6 to 9 — as the original ensembles which are usually around 18 to 21 in number. A distinguishing stylistic feature is the interplay between the guitar and the saxophone (usually alto). Another is the standardization of the drum kit rhythm which was pioneered by the drummer on this recording, Smith “Smitty” Jean-Baptiste. The pattern is very similar to the quintilla of the danzones from Oriente, Cuba. It is performed by using a crash type cymbal alternately choked and released by the left hand with a drum stick used to impart a “sizzle” effect, not by the hi-hat as asserted by some critics. Arguably the most influential ensemble from this period was Ibo Combo, with early Shleu-Shleu, Volo Volo, Groupe Latino, Scorpio and Les Loups Noires also highly regarded.

  9. @ jeanluc
    Thanks for the information. I mistakenly confused this band with the other “Shleus” and wrote that Smitty was a part of this one too.

    There has been quite a bit of rivalry — some of it not so friendly — between musicians from the French Antilles and Haïti over the years. Many innovations, including «Compas Direct» itself, and later the «Zouk» movement of the 1980s, emerged in response to the perception that the other group had invaded the home turf and threatened the survival of the respective indigenous musical traditions. While you are correct that «Cadense» can refer to a particular style, it has also come to describe an entire range of musics based on afro-franco-caribbean traditions including beguine, meringue, zouk, troubadou, merengue, son frances and, of course, konpa. Additionally, through the exchange of phonodiscs, there is a great deal of cross-pollination between «Cadense» and “High Life” from Ghana.

    @avocado kid
    The name doesn’t really mean anything; it was merely evocative of African language.

  10. @ jeanluc
    Thanks for the information. I mistakenly confused this band with the other “Shleus” and wrote that Smitty was a part of this one too.

    There has been quite a bit of rivalry — some of it not so friendly — between musicians from the French Antilles and Haïti over the years. Many innovations, including «Compas Direct» itself, and later the «Zouk» movement of the 1980s, emerged in response to the perception that the other group had invaded the home turf and threatened the survival of the respective indigenous musical traditions. While you are correct that «Cadense» can refer to a particular style, it has also come to describe an entire range of musics based on afro-franco-caribbean traditions including beguine, meringue, zouk, troubadou, merengue, son frances and, of course, konpa. Additionally, through the exchange of phonodiscs, there is a great deal of cross-pollination between «Cadense» and “High Life” from Ghana.

    @avocado kid
    The name doesn’t really mean anything; it was merely evocative of African language.

  11. You are the best blogger organiser esp. your music is easily and accessible. You are the best!!! Is there by any means you could upload Disco South African Oldies? Love your Congolese collection as well. please more on Tshala Muana, Mbilia bel etc. Got pepe classics here so thus a pluss+++
    This is a real place to be,

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