Merveilles du Passé
Hommage au Grand Kalle
Joseph Kabassele et l’African Jazz, Vol. 1
african 1984

I quote ‘World Music, The Rough Guide’ ; “The Congolese music scene really came
alive in 1953 with the inauguration of African Jazz, the first full-time recording and
performing orchestra, led by Joseph ‘Le Grand Kalle’ Kabassele.” The acknowledged
‘father of Congolese Rumba’ started his musical career as a 19 year old in 1949, having
‘an angel’s voice’. Some of the greatest artists made their name in this group, names
like Jean Serge Essous, Nino Malapet but also Nico Kassanda, better known as Docteur
Nico and Pascal Tabu Ley Rochereau. Enjoy this 1986 compilation on african.

tracks;

1 African mokili mobimba
2 Bacara
3 Africa bola ngombi
4 Bombon sucre
5 Mayele mabe
6 Kayi Kayi
7 Succes African Jazz
8 Naboyi vie ya mbangu
9 Ennemi na ngai ya kala
10 El que siembra su maïz
11 Linda calegnita

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17 thoughts on “Merveilles du Passé
Hommage au Grand Kalle
Joseph Kabassele et l’African Jazz, Vol. 1
african 1984

  1. Great post – thanks.
    Wuod K – Nico and his brother Dechaud are probably the guitarists throughout, although another sibling by the name of Tino Baroza was lead guitar on many older African Jazz recordings. The clarinet on “Africa Bola Ngombi” may be Nino or Essous but Manu (Dibango)is clearly mentioned as the sax player on that track, and that sounds like him on “Mayele Mabe”. It may well be him on piano on “Bonbon Sucre” too. I would love to hear more of him with the early African Jazz. I once heard an amazing band instrumental called “Merengue Fafa” featuring Manu and Nico tearing riffs out each other, on a John Storm Roberts compilation called “Afro-Cuban Comes Home”, but precious little else – Manu Dibango with African Jazz?? There must be more of that stuff!! Anyone out there know of any?
    MamboPete

  2. Great post – thanks.
    Wuod K – Nico and his brother Dechaud are probably the guitarists throughout, although another sibling by the name of Tino Baroza was lead guitar on many older African Jazz recordings. The clarinet on “Africa Bola Ngombi” may be Nino or Essous but Manu (Dibango)is clearly mentioned as the sax player on that track, and that sounds like him on “Mayele Mabe”. It may well be him on piano on “Bonbon Sucre” too. I would love to hear more of him with the early African Jazz. I once heard an amazing band instrumental called “Merengue Fafa” featuring Manu and Nico tearing riffs out each other, on a John Storm Roberts compilation called “Afro-Cuban Comes Home”, but precious little else – Manu Dibango with African Jazz?? There must be more of that stuff!! Anyone out there know of any?
    MamboPete

  3. My understanding from these “Hommage” series from African or Sonodisc, is that the album is a compilation of songs by the artist themselves, in this case Grand Kalle et l’African Jazz. Pity it doesn’t list the band members though…

  4. My understanding from these “Hommage” series from African or Sonodisc, is that the album is a compilation of songs by the artist themselves, in this case Grand Kalle et l’African Jazz. Pity it doesn’t list the band members though…

  5. Obviously no way Tino Baroza was his real name, by all accounts an excellent player, among his compositions is the African Jazz classic “Jamais Kolonga”, recorded years later by Sam Mangwana. MamboPete

  6. Obviously no way Tino Baroza was his real name, by all accounts an excellent player, among his compositions is the African Jazz classic “Jamais Kolonga”, recorded years later by Sam Mangwana. MamboPete

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