l’Unité Africaine vol.1 – Various Artists,Pathé Marconi / EMI 1978

l'Unité Africaine vol.1, front

I’m gonna tell you straight away, posting this album is a kind
of compromise. It contains a few things I would not post when
standing on it’s own. Nigerian reggae for instance, I think reggae
should be from Jamaica. And how about rock and roll sung in
wolof from Senegal. As a whole however I think it’s kind of funny.
The collector also contains some typical African styles, like on
the b-side, sweet benga by Victoria King’s Jazz for instance.
It’s a 1978 selection made by Blaise Fayette Mikano who used
to do a great job for Pathé Marconi. I think this LP with songs from
1975, 1977 and 1978 gives us a unique view on Africa’s taste
during the late seventies, listen and tell me what you think.

tracks;

1 Sonny Okosun – Rain
2 Konn-Konn – Sagak-sagak
3 Abeti Masikini – Mwana muke wa miso
4 M’baye Abdoul – Soko bouge
5 M’baye Abdoul – Douces douces filles
6 Victoria King’s Jazz – Rieko Magftich
7 Trio Ce.Pa.Kos – No title
8 Kouka Celestin – Veve na linga
9 Pamelo Mounk’a – Mabeyey

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16 thoughts on “l’Unité Africaine vol.1 – Various Artists,Pathé Marconi / EMI 1978

  1. Hey Anonymous, I don’t think reggae is from Jamaica, I know reggae is from Jamaica. For me there is maybe some from England but further I’m not interested. Sorry..

  2. Hey Anonymous, I don’t think reggae is from Jamaica, I know reggae is from Jamaica. For me there is maybe some from England but further I’m not interested. Sorry..

  3. yes, my dear friend, we are getting older and have developed our very special taste for that what can touch our mind and heart. but may I remind you that we would not have all this sweet music from africa if they would not get influenced from music all over of the world, not the sweet soukous without the rumba, and not the rumba with so many others? but I know what you mean, cause I’m also not so much interested in reggae from africa – with some exceptions.
    at all I thank you very much for posting this record, it’s old enough to be a document of the past and I will find my favorites on it.
    jo_schroedter

  4. yes, my dear friend, we are getting older and have developed our very special taste for that what can touch our mind and heart. but may I remind you that we would not have all this sweet music from africa if they would not get influenced from music all over of the world, not the sweet soukous without the rumba, and not the rumba with so many others? but I know what you mean, cause I’m also not so much interested in reggae from africa – with some exceptions.
    at all I thank you very much for posting this record, it’s old enough to be a document of the past and I will find my favorites on it.
    jo_schroedter

  5. Moos,
    Thanks for this record.
    Just to note that track number 7 is by Victoria King’s Jazz – and the title is Jane Toto.

  6. Moos,
    Thanks for this record.
    Just to note that track number 7 is by Victoria King’s Jazz – and the title is Jane Toto.

  7. Sorry you got it wrong!!
    CePaKos were wonderful but they never sang in a Dholuo dialect – a dialect spoken predominantly by the Luos of Kenya.

  8. Sorry you got it wrong!!
    CePaKos were wonderful but they never sang in a Dholuo dialect – a dialect spoken predominantly by the Luos of Kenya.

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